Le cose che ami sono quelle importanti...


let-yaoi-be-with-you:

thenoodlebooty:

luigigrivera:

i can’t stop laughting

This was an adventure

GREAT.

let-yaoi-be-with-you:

thenoodlebooty:

luigigrivera:

i can’t stop laughting

This was an adventure

GREAT.

Source: ragecomics4you

piperme:

art history meme
↳ art nouveau  ||  [1/5] movements

Source: piperme

mad-sound:

HOW can you not love this man?

Source: mad-sound

nevvyinthetardislock:

PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST
burnthepasttotheground  imperialguard64  zombieslayer283  slickdiamond
ourfeminismftw  facesofpriviledge  lolimawomyn  random-guy-universe
oldsexistwhiteguy renamorcen  pussyjuice69  flyingpiratemonkey 
bottomfeeder666  pottergeek622  hobo-boy throw-away-opinions
tenorsexophone

nevvyinthetardislock:

PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST

burnthepasttotheground  imperialguard64  zombieslayer283  slickdiamond

ourfeminismftw  facesofpriviledge  lolimawomyn  random-guy-universe

oldsexistwhiteguy renamorcen  pussyjuice69  flyingpiratemonkey

bottomfeeder666  pottergeek622  hobo-boy throw-away-opinions

tenorsexophone

Source: nevvyinthetardislock

skunkbear:

What makes fireworks colorful?

It all thanks to the luminescence of metals. When certain metals are heated (over a flame or in a hot explosion) their electrons jump up to a higher energy state. When those electrons fall back down, they emit specific frequencies of light - and each chemical has a unique emission spectrum.

You can see that the most prominent bands in the spectra above match the firework colors. The colors often burn brighter with the addition of an electron donor like Chlorine (Cl). 

But the metals alone wouldn’t look like much. They need to be excited. Black powder (mostly nitrates like KNO3) provides oxygen for the rapid reduction of charcoal (C) to create a lot hot expanding gas - the BOOM. That, in turn, provides the energy for luminescence - the AWWWW.

Aluminium has a special role — it emits a bright white light … and makes sparks!

Images: Charles D. Winters, Andrew Lambert Photography / Science Source, iStockphoto, Epic Fireworks, Softyx, Mark Schellhase, Walkerma, Firetwister, Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com, Søren Wedel Nielsen

Source: skunkbear

ruinedchildhood:

They need these at all parties.

ruinedchildhood:

They need these at all parties.

wannyy:

This was actually uploaded to PornHub. That’s how good it was. Just saying.

wannyy:

This was actually uploaded to PornHub. That’s how good it was. Just saying.

Source: boyerworks

ericscissorhands:

"He who fights with monsters should be careful lest he thereby become a monster. And if thou gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will also gaze into thee."

Source: ericscissorhands

escapefrommetalgear:

key-feathers:

Practical wings created as a starting point for the CGI ones on Maleficent! 

I want to try and create a pair of wings of this size (personal project ;) ) These photos are a great inspiration! 

Source: http://disney.wikia.com/

hnnnng

Source: key-feathers

scholar-of-imagination:

jyzavi:

twofingerswhiskey:

nightmarebc:

satanhasclaimedthisblog:

anewwhovian:

Okay so, the Doctor is from out of space but does he only breathe oxygen like everyone else? Does Gallifrey have an atmosphere like Earth’s? Because I’d never thought about it before now but he seems to be struggling just as much as everyone else and he does seem to have the same basic anatomy as a human, other than the two hearts. 
Anyone care to answer?

Gallifrey’s atmosphere is 77% Nitrogen, 21% Oxygen and 2% other, which means that it’s similar to Earth’s atmosphere, but it’s a bit thinner. The Doctor needs oxygen as well, but Time Lords have a raspiratory bypass system that allows them to go without breathing for a longer time span than humans.

Most fandoms have some pretty deep canon. The Doctor Who fandom can tell you the concentrations of gas in the atmosphere of the home planet of the main character. DW Fandom > Your fandom

This also means that Earth’s atmosphere gets the Doctor high, because it has double (or triple, I can’t do math, forgive me) the oxygen of Gallifrey. Obviously the TARDIS has an Earth-like oxygen level inside of it, which can explain why he’s so bloody hyper all the time.

so are you telling me that the Doctor protects Earth because it’s where he gets his fix is that it

Yup. We’ve gone insane. 

scholar-of-imagination:

jyzavi:

twofingerswhiskey:

nightmarebc:

satanhasclaimedthisblog:

anewwhovian:

Okay so, the Doctor is from out of space but does he only breathe oxygen like everyone else? Does Gallifrey have an atmosphere like Earth’s? Because I’d never thought about it before now but he seems to be struggling just as much as everyone else and he does seem to have the same basic anatomy as a human, other than the two hearts. 

Anyone care to answer?

Gallifrey’s atmosphere is 77% Nitrogen, 21% Oxygen and 2% other, which means that it’s similar to Earth’s atmosphere, but it’s a bit thinner.
The Doctor needs oxygen as well, but Time Lords have a raspiratory bypass system that allows them to go without breathing for a longer time span than humans.

Most fandoms have some pretty deep canon. The Doctor Who fandom can tell you the concentrations of gas in the atmosphere of the home planet of the main character. DW Fandom > Your fandom

This also means that Earth’s atmosphere gets the Doctor high, because it has double (or triple, I can’t do math, forgive me) the oxygen of Gallifrey. Obviously the TARDIS has an Earth-like oxygen level inside of it, which can explain why he’s so bloody hyper all the time.

so are you telling me that the Doctor protects Earth because it’s where he gets his fix is that it

Yup. We’ve gone insane. 

Source: anewwhovian